Tag Archives: comida mejicana

Everything for tamales.. and baluts, too!

Boy howdy! I’ve been seeing how easy it is to procure tamale-making materials and hardware here in Kansas City. The tiendas and carnicerias in the barrio where I live have several models of tamale steamers for sale. Here’s the bucket version, which probably works well on a cajun Cooker.

steamer

Bucket type tamale steamer

Of course, there are several options for masa, from the Maseca & Masa Harina commercial brands and the stores sell five-pound plastic bags of fresh tamale masa.

masa

prepared masa

And the hojas de maiz are readily available nearly everywhere. I was at the big Asian supermarket downtown a few days before Christmas and Latinas were buying scads of packaged frozen banana leaves “para tamales de Navidad”. Just down the aisle I found a display of baluts (a Filipino bar snack of unborn duck eggs) right next to the durians. Nummers.

stinky

durian

So fill up your steamers with tamales, folks!

in steamer

In the steamer.

Buen provecho, y’all. Y un prospero año nuevo!

Chorizo from Carniceria El Torito #1, KCMO

Hijole! El Torito makes some of the best chorizo mejicano I have ever had. Just made some breakfast tacos with aigs, taters, serranos and their chorizo. Que rrrrico!

Carniceria El Torito
4901 Saint John Ave, Kansas City, MO 64123-1842
(816) 920-5307 ‎

Pozole 101

Before I left for Thanksgiving, I made pozole.

I used:

Stock

~3/4 lb pork bones from Belmont. (the pork neck bones you get at the regular store are often full of bone chips, which can be a PITA)
1 small onion un-peeled, cut in quarters
6 smashed cloves of garlic
2 bay leaves
some salt

simmer for ~3 hours, making 1 1/2 quarts of stock. Strain. Take meat off bones and reserve.

3/4 cup dried Los Chileros white corn pozole; soaked overnight.
1 1/2 cubed pork (with some fat) 1/2″ cubes
2 tbs oil or lard or bacon fat
1 1/2 cup chopped onion
2 smashed cloves of garlic.
2 chopped Roma tomatoes
1 tbs mexican oregano
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tbs chile caribe (or real ground chiles)
half a jar of La Frontera guajillo sauce.
salt to taste
juice of half a lime

Cook the pozole in water or stock until it’s nearly reconstituted.

Sauté pork in fat, until browned nicely
add onions & garlic, saute until translucent, add tomatoes, oregano, cumin, chile, the reserved pork from stock making, and some stock. Cook this down a bit.

Add pozole, guajillo sauce, a bit of salt and the rest of the simmering stock. Stir. If you need more fluid, add beer, chicken stock or water.

Bring to a simmer and cover allowing it to cook for 1-2 hours.

pozole

Que rico!

Serve with fresh corn tortillas, a squirt of limón, chopped onion & chopped cilantro.

I missed the food..

It got cold, but the food smelled great and I had a cup of Mexican chocolate to see if it would warm me up after I put on my jacket.  It didn’t but here are some photos of La Milpa’s Dia  de los Muertos celebration.

one of the altars.

Altar for Dia de los Muertos at La Milpa on Hull Street

Here’s more

calaca

Una calaca

Here’s a dancer

danzante

Danzante

Here’s some comida

comida

Que rico!

More comida.

mas coida!

Mas comida!

Tamales..

tamales

Be still my heart, tamales..

There were some Colombians serving arepas. I had one, but I was still cold. So I went home.

Tacos al pastor en Kansas City, MO.

These were all take-out orders..
from Carniceria El Torito!

Tacos al pastor from Carniceria El Torito!

And they are only a buck on Tuesdays!

Tacos al pastor from Taqueria Mejico #2
Tacos al pastor from Taqueria Mejico #2

At this place one can sit down and have a Bohemia, a much better beer than Dos Equis.  I would be happy to shill for Bohemia since I am a lot more interesting than the most interesting man in the world. I’ve read he’s really from Brooklyn and formerly a lawyer.

Here’s a painting from the wall of the Carniceria El Torito (on St Johns). Nice place, nice folks.

pintura de chancho

Pintura de chancho

Diana Kennedy & José Andres.

At the National Archives 7:pm in DC. Sept 15, 2011.  I’d consider going but I don’t think I will. It’s free. (I can’t get a good link for the National Archives. It must be on the DNS level.)

They will be discussing the Cuisine of Mexico. I met Ms Kennedy this June while waiting for a plane back to Richmond at DFW.

TBS & DSK

Yo y la maestra.

PANCHITO (Formerly THE HOOK)

After weeks of watching the work go on in the rehabbing of this former Midlothian TPKE fried fish emporium into a taqueria, I noticed that it was OPENING SOON!

sopes

Nearest the camera, carne al pastor, then carnitas, then carne asada..

And it was called PANCHITO Restaurante Mejicano y Taqueria (Authentic)  (or something like that) and we decided to investigate this place on Saturday. We met at one PM (I got there first and was able to find a menu and got an agua gaseosa (mineral water). We only wanted a snack, so rather than getting full plates, I decided that we should split three sopes (thick corn tortillas with a rim/edge) and chose carnitas (fried pork bits), carne al pastor (marinated pork), and carne asada (grilled beef).

After our order was placed, my brain was picked re: local ethnic grocery stores, educational background, and common acquaintances.

Our order arrived and we fell to with some salsa verde of moderate picante added to our meal. Everything tasted authentic and was approved of. The toppings were a trifle dry, but we couldn’t really see ordering fully sauced dishes at that time of the day, since we had other things to accomplish before the day was out.  I want to come back and try some of the platters; I think they had chicharron en salsa verde. I may go back by and pick up a menu.

It also seemed on the pricey side.. I would have expected the platters to be at least a dollar or so less.

PANCHITO is open most days from 10 AM to 10 PM.. Fridays & Saturdays from 10  AM to 4 AM. It could prove to be too interesting a place to visit in the early morning hours since it is right next to several transient motels. You young folks can live large, but I’ll pass.

signage

Panchito Taqueria

And one should note that the formica booths are not for large folks.

inside panchito

the charm of formica and the transient motel..

End of Two weeks in Kansas City.

Well, the high point turned out to be during the 4.5 hour layover in DFW where I got to meet one of my culinary heroes. I was at a gate in the D concourse where my Richmond flight was to leave after a flight to Mexico City left. It turned out the flight to Mexico City was delayed and an elderly lady sat down across from me. I noticed that DSK was inscribed upon her rolling duffle and she looked familiar. I went over to her and said:

“Pardon me, are you Diana Kennedy?”

She said she indeed was Diana Kennedy and we had about a 10 minute chat where I told her that I had most of her cookbooks and had really appreciated her work. She told me that she’s working with a couple of ethnobotanists on a huge volume on chiles and that she and José Andrés are planning to do a presentation at the Kennedy Center on the Deiz y Seis de Septiembre.

I asked if I could take a photo of her and she said “Get someone to take one of the both of us!” So here it is..

DKS y TBS

Una encuentra con la maestra!

After this, I had to check the departure screen and had to hoof it to concourse C.  I heard some guys saying that they’d seen Roger Staubach in the concourse.

Roger who?

~~~~~

The two weeks in KC were quite good, BTW.  I saw my wife,  and my son and his wife (for a few days on their way back to Toronto) and my mother-in-law, who had arrived Tuesday from Oregon.

We ate asian dumplings at BLUE KOI

dumplings

Pork dumplings at BLUE KOI (we ate there three times!)

Great mezze at LITTLE EGYPT (sorry, no photo but here’s one of the Farmer’s Market which opens at 5:30AM. These guys aren’t “hobby farmers“! No sir!)

kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Samosas, kebabs, & rooh afza (a chilled & delicious pink rosewater & milk drink) at CHAI SHAI

chai shai

Lamb kebab & rooh afza (we ate at Chai Shai twice)

and I made the rounds of various taquerias getting a fix of serious Mexican food which is not to common around here, except at LA MILPA

guacamalera

La Guacamalera (they make guacamole at your table in some places)

And several BOULEVARD ales were quaffed. BTW, BOULEVARD has joined up with DESCHUTES brewery from Bend, Oregon and they will be in the KC area in a few months. Be still my heart.

Eat More Goat..

Good stuff here. Back in Texas, I used to cook goats for get-togethers. I cooked a halal goat leg from Petra Market along with two shoulder clods from Belmont Butchery last year for my son’s wedding in Nelson County. Here’s a photo of the goat leg.

goat leg

Anointed goat leg.

Finished goat leg

At the wedding, there were Cypriots, Mexicans, Ecuadoreans and at least one Spaniard. They were amazed at how tender the goat was. Halal goats tend to be happy (tender) goats. I draw the line at cooking anxious goats and goats that have been hassled prior to the time of their demise.

From the Bay Area food blog THE ETHICUREAN:

Goat meat is already very popular around the world – the Washington Post claims that goat makes up almost 70 percent of the red meat eaten globally – and its popularity could increase in the U.S. because of the convergence of several things:  renewed interest in grass-fed animals; openings of new butcher shops or revitalization of old shops (such as Avedano’s in San Francisco’s Bernal Heights), and increasing numbers of U.S. residents from Latin America and South Asia. With a bit of education and experimentation by farmers, butchers, chefs and home cooks, this adaptable animal could become a key part of a return to meat raised on pastures.

http://www.ethicurean.com/2011/06/12/goats/

THE ETHICUREAN is a good, non-fluffy, food blog.

 

Texas Pork

Some old amigos of mine back in Texas dispatched a pig this weekend and it’s now secure in the freezer! Que amable, gueyes!

pig-in-freezer

Los vatos con un chancho bien fria!